25 Free Clothes Pin Bag Patterns

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Here is a collection of free clothes pin bag patterns and tutorials I’ve found from around the net plus I tucked in a vintage embroidery goody at the bottom (a dancing wooden peg on a bar of soap, too cute!). Most of the tutorials are for sewing but there are a few crochet projects too. Enjoy!

madewithlovebyhannah.com

madewithlovebyhannah.com

Dirndle: Could this be more adorable? Instructions via pdf download.

With Grommets: Open top with two grommets along the back to sit on a hanging bar.

k8tykat.typepad.com

k8tykat.typepad.com

marthastewart.com

marthastewart.com

Two-Tabs: This buttons over the line, holds all the pegs you’ll need, and conveniently slides along the line as you work.

Easy Oil Cloth: Details are sparse but that’s all you need to get this made, front slit pocket is finished with zig-zag stitch and seam binding.

thehemline.blogspot.ca

thehemline.blogspot.ca

littlegreybungalow.blogspot.ca

littlegreybungalow.blogspot.ca

Ticking: Love this vintage goody (it’s from 1916)! You’ll find the 2nd page here. From Little Grey Bungalow’s collection.

Hanging: This is a laundry sack but works well for holding pegs too (adjust length as needed). Circa 1944.

tipnut.com

tipnut.com

myluckychicken.typepad.com

myluckychicken.typepad.com

Front Pocket: Features open front pocket and fold over top flap that is buttoned over the line or child size hanger. Click on images in tutorial to see larger size.

Repurposed Curtain: Also shows how to bend and snip a wire hanger to slip inside.

craftleftovers.com

craftleftovers.com

blessingsoverflowing.com

blessingsoverflowing.com

Made With A Placemat: Super easy! Sew up the sides and fold over hanger then sew in place.

For Wooden Hanger: Round open front and fits over a wooden hanger.

appliejuice.wordpress.com

appliejuice.wordpress.com

sukigirl74.blogspot.ca

sukigirl74.blogspot.ca

Crocheted: Simple to make, lined with fabric. No directions for the wee clothing embellishments.

Scoop Front: Open scoop front finished with double fold bias binding.

sewing.about.com

sewing.about.com

crochetnmore.com

crochetnmore.com

Crocheted With 2 Strands of Yarn: Features fold over buttoned tab at top and open front scoop.

Apron Bonnet: This vintage sweetie is an apron that converts to a bonnet or a pouch to hold pegs.

tipnut.com

tipnut.com

motherearthnews.com

motherearthnews.com

European Style Apron: An easy to make big-pocket apron perfect for laundry day (and holding pegs).

Recycled Denim: Made with a pair of old jeans and ric-rac (optional).

craftstylish.com

craftstylish.com

bizzycrochet.blogspot.ca

bizzycrochet.blogspot.ca

Weather Resistant: Crocheted. Made with Multipurpose Mason Line-twisted nylon.

Fabric & Felt: Features a cute felt applique! lol!

clairesblog.paynedesign.co.uk

clairesblog.paynedesign.co.uk

joanne-threadhead.blogspot.ca

joanne-threadhead.blogspot.ca

Quilted: So adorable! There is a handwritten grid pattern that you can download, no applique designs though (but they’re simple enough to figure out).

Hoop: A embroidery hoop is attached at the opening (for easy access), hangs by a strip that snaps over line.

smallfryandco.blogspot.ca

smallfryandco.blogspot.ca

cutoutandkeep.net

cutoutandkeep.net

Little Dress: Open front and fits over a wire hanger.

Floral: Front pocket is trimmed with rick rack and grosgrain ribbon.

housetohome.co.uk

housetohome.co.uk

makeitfromscratch.blogspot.ca

makeitfromscratch.blogspot.ca

Made With A Placemat: Features a scrap strip for strap that attaches with velcro.

Sack: (crocheted) This is worked in one piece, has a round bottom and simple drawstring closure at top.

bohoknits.blogspot.ca

bohoknits.blogspot.ca

myrecycledbags.com

myrecycledbags.com

Recycled: Crocheted, made with plastic bag yarn (plarn).

Vintage Download

You can click the image below to print out this sweet vintage character, transfer it to fabric if you like and embroider. It’s an animated clothespin bouncing on a bar of soap from an old design I have (the complete project is too large to scan and share unfortunately).

Click To View Larger Size

Click To View Larger Size

Original Notes:

  • The design may be appliqued in any gay print or outlined in green or red. Limbs and features are black outline, eyes blue satin stitch and mouth red. Soap and lettering on it are blue; broken lines black.

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Published: February 23, 2008
Updated: June 12, 2013

What Readers Are Saying:
22 Comments to “25 Free Clothes Pin Bag Patterns”
  1. Sadge says:

    My mom gave me some old pattern transfers – no envelopes or identifying marks, just the folded transfer sheets. One of them has the same little jumping clothespin at the top of your post. I’m going to post the finished clothespin bag I made from it on my blog eventually. I was just wondering if you know where the original is from (they look kind of like Aunt Martha’s). Thanks.
    Sadge

  2. Barb says:

    I have not had a clothes line for 13 years, due to the fact that we moved to a subdivision with covenants that do not allow them. This past November, in an act of common sense, defiance, and well, just to save energy and enjoy once again the smell of fresh clothes, we installed our clothesline poles in “the dark of night”. (well, not really). Two days ago (March 4) my husband stringed the lines, just in time for unseasonal 70 degree weather. I feel like someone has given me a new car! I have washed all of the sheets, towels, sweaters, quilts, etc., and they smell so great. But, guess what? Went to over 5 stores, could not find a “clothespin bag” anywhere. Googled the bag, and found this site. LOVE the shirt idea, so simple and cute! Better than any clothespin bag I could ever buy anywhere! Save the earth, save energy, use the dryer only in winter time! Life is great!~~Barb

    • Patricia says:

      I too live in a “deed restricted” community, but I have read that in the interest of saving energy there is some law or rule that says you can hang clothes outside as long as the clothes line(s) can be removed when not in use. I remember my Mom having one of those umbrella kind of units that could be folded and taken out of the base that was installed in the ground. Of course back in the olden days, who took the lines down? They were always full of clothing, sheets, towels, etc. There is nothing beter than the smell of sunshine dried sheets and towels.

  3. Eileen says:

    Yes, I am proud to be an American! I am proud to live in the United States. I am proud to hang my clothes when ever I can! What a small freedom, and no one will take that from me! Oh the memories, the smells, the exercise!

    • HappyGenny says:

      Love the enthusiasm for line drying and environmentally responsible choices. Yay! Please tell me, however, that you are being facetious about the American thing. I believe that we are LEAST likely to see this in the US and Canada due to a whole lot of uptight middle class ideas on ‘looking affluent’ and general prudishness. Thankfully modern culture and increased multi-culturalism have taken this attitude down a few notches, but you will still see very few urban/suburban homes with knickers on the line. Except, perhaps, at my house. (chuckles)

  4. laswa says:

    How do I find the diagram/pattern that supposedly goes with the european-style apron. I have had the same problem finding “accessory” content on the Mother Earth News articles before. Thanks in advance…

    • TipNut says:

      Hi laswa, you’ll see an “Image Gallery” link, click that and the first picture you see is a woman wearing the apron, click the “next” link and you’ll see the pattern page to print. Hope that helps!

    • Mindy says:

      I made this apron about 2 years ago and it is great. It can get heavy if you have a lot of pins in it but it is very convenient.

  5. L. Barnes says:

    Would like to find the old style clothes pins, the spring pins break too easy.

    • Vicky (The Crafty Rocker) says:

      @L.Barnes – the only place I’ve found regular “peg” clothespin, instead of the spring type, was at craft stores, Like Michaels. You may also find them online.

  6. deirdre says:

    Great peg-bags! The patterns for the little clothes on the front of the ‘Crochet-peg-bag’ are now on her site page as well!

  7. Sharlene says:

    I remember wearing the apron/bonnet/clothespin style back in the 50′s. I still make them. I used an old one Granny made me for a pattern – just made it larger & cut two apron parts. That way it is reversible.

  8. Les Hoover says:

    Help! I’ve looked at the bags here and elsewhere and I find a lot of really cute bags. Trouble is, I’m a 59 year old man and I just don’t get along with cute! Can anyone direct me to something that looks a bit more masculine.

    • Rachel says:

      Sew the bottom of a mans tee shirt. Hang your shit on a hanger and wa la you have a masculine clothes pin bag!!!

  9. Linda says:

    Wow! Thanks! These patterns were from 2008 – before I knew about Tipnut. This is 2012 – I hope Joanne finds these patterns!

  10. Carmen Russell says:

    Thanks for these patterns they will be useful to me i use clothes pins very often.

  11. Laura B. says:

    @ Les – I have made a very simple clothespin bag that doesn’t require any sewing and you can make in about 2 minutes. Here are the instructions – go to the dollar store and buy a mesh laundry bag that is used to wash delicates – then take a wire clothes hanger and bend it until it fits the width of the bag – unzip the bag, then poke the hook of the hanger through the top of the bag. DONE!
    I like this because if the bag is hanging outside on the line and it rains the water just runs though the mesh and the clothes pins dry quickly and don’t get mildewy. Definitely not “cute” but very functional.

  12. virginia Long says:

    I HAVE BEEN FOLLOWING YOU FOR A LONG TIME NOW AND LOVE YOUR STYLE WHEN I NEED SOMETHING TO MAKE I CAN ALWAYS RELY ON YOU. KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK.

  13. cheryl says:

    I made the bag from crochetnmore.com and it is wonderful. I didn’t have a button, so I just clothespin it to the clothesline. I used Red Heart yarn and it has survived all weather extremes. Thank you for the idea!

  14. Kris says:

    When i was growing up we never had a dryer so we always had to hang the clothes to dry either in the basement in the winter or outside when the weather was 1/2 way nice. Once in awhile it was a little too cool and when mom had had us hung the clothes out,they’d gotten a little icy..oye :o) Ahhh,the memories…hehehe :o) I still have lines myself and now my one daughter has some and is asking for a bag so told her i would make her one, the best being the one with a hanger(i think..after years of being stuck doing it as a child!!)as it can be taken off and hung up somewhere else,moved along as you go with ease and holds lots of pins.

  15. Nancy says:

    Does anyone know how to get the hangers typically used for these bags? (Twirly hook in a single wooden hanger) The closest I can find are the plastic hangers with a twirly metal hook – but those plastic ones break too easily…..

  16. Patricia says:

    I live in the perfect clime for drying clothes on a line and I just love the smell of clothes that were hung out to dry. I live in the Caribbean. I am almost always tempted during the rainy season (we have only two seasons the rainy or wet season and the dry season) to buy a dryer, but I do so love to smell my clothes when they are sun dried. Most of my friends have dryers but I have not gone over to that side as yet.


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