40+ Free Apron Patterns & Tutorials

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Collection[Updated 2012] Whether you’re looking for something frilly, fancy or just plain practical, this apron collection has you covered!

I’ve handpicked dozens of free patterns from around the web and organized them here in one handy spot for you to browse through.

You’ll find simple, easy designs that are ideal for beginner sewers as well as more advanced projects suitable for those with more experience.

I’ve separated them into three groups so you can find what you’re looking for quick as a wink (Full, Half & Assorted).

I’ll be adding more to this page over time so you may want to bookmark it for future reference. Enjoy!

PS: Don’t miss the free ebooks I put together that are packed full of vintage tutorials, you’ll find them on this page (mainly for women but there are a few for men and children as well). If you’re a fan of retro styles, you just hit the jackpot!

Full

jordanapaige.com

jordanapaige.com

Kitschy: 1 yard is used for the main body then three complimentary fabrics and trim are used for the rest.

Frilly: Five tiers of ruffles below the waist using five different complimentary fabrics.

spotlight.com.au

spotlight.com.au

sewinginnomansland.com

sewinginnomansland.com

Maids-A-Milking: Two different designs, both featuring a ruffled bottom, one also features frills along the top.

Unisex: Suitable for both men and women, this chef’s style is a popular classic.

purlbee.com

purlbee.com

womansday.com

womansday.com

Floral Pinafore: Pullover neck strap and ties at the back, template pieces via pdf download.

Denim: A pair of Levi jeans will make two of these.

kimboscrafts.blogspot.ca

kimboscrafts.blogspot.ca

onjustacoupleacres.blogspot.ca

onjustacoupleacres.blogspot.ca

Gathering: Ideal for berry picking or harvesting goodies from the garden.

Paisley: Ties at the neck and waist, trimmed with 7/8″ lace. Via pdf download.

fabriceditions.com

fabriceditions.com

theribbonretreat.com

theribbonretreat.com

Pleated Hem: Main body is one piece, contrasting fabric for the hem and shoulder straps.

Morocco: Scroll down page to “Studio 8 – Morocco” to find the pdf to download.

quiltingtreasures.com

quiltingtreasures.com

honeybearlane.com

honeybearlane.com

Muslin Lined: Patchwork body, pleated hem and shoulder straps in complimentary fabric.

Fifties Style: Has a big pocket in the front and is sewn with 2 yards of 45″ fabric and embellished with rick rack or other trim if you like.

craftygal.com

craftygal.com

preciousinfants.com

preciousinfants.com

Center Pocket: Ties at the neck and waist.

Chef’s: Provides two pdf templates to download, has two long waist straps that can tie around the front if you like. Suitable for both men and women.

marthastewart.com

marthastewart.com

sew4home.com

sew4home.com

Mom’s Favorite: Has buckle straps, is knee length and a big center pocket to hold supplies.

Make-Do: A vintage-style keeper that’s made with an old shirt, contrasting fabric and trim.

maryjanesfarm.org

maryjanesfarm.org

curbly.com

curbly.com

From Napkins: Easy peasy project that’s ideal for beginner sewers.

Garden: Made with 5 fat quarters, lightweight cotton webbing, rick rack and 1/2 yard of fabric for top and pocket lining.

sew4home.com

sew4home.com

joann.com

joann.com

Josephine: Bodice is gathered at top and bottom, tutorial via pdf download.

Pleated: Has two roomy front pockets and ties around the neck and waist.

sew4home.com

sew4home.com

analogme.typepad.com

analogme.typepad.com

Ruffled Front: Repurposes a men’s shirt, has ruffles stitched down the front half.

Button-Down: Made with 2 large or extra-large men’s long-sleeved, button-down shirts.

larkcrafts.com

larkcrafts.com

joannfabricandcraftstores.blogspot.ca

joannfabricandcraftstores.blogspot.ca

Ruffled: Features layers of 4 to 5 different coordinating cotton prints (3/8 yard each).

Half

stitchesinplay.typepad.com

stitchesinplay.typepad.com

No Seams Exposed: Contrasting fabric around the waist and hem, shares a technique for sewing with the seams enclosed.

Reversible Scalloped: Fancy & flirty, this one’s fully reversible and has pockets.

warehousefabricsinc.com

warehousefabricsinc.com

twomoreseconds.com

twomoreseconds.com

Zig-Zag: Features a pretty strip of patchwork along the bottom, edges trimmed with bias tape.

Vintage Pillowcase: Gathers at the waist and has long enough ties they can go back or front.

craftydame.blogspot.ca

craftydame.blogspot.ca

betzwhite.com

betzwhite.com

10-Minute Project: All you need is 2 yards of ribbon and a pillowcase to make this.

Double Layers: Basically 2 layers of skirt gathered onto a waistband and trimmed with bias binding.

knot-dresses.com

knot-dresses.com

mooshkette.squarespace.com

mooshkette.squarespace.com

Mooshkette’s: Lovely double ruffle hem, you’ll need 1.5 yards of fabric, single fold bias tape and jumbo rickrack (optional).

Stash Happy: Retro style made from an upcycled pillowcase, fabric scraps and coordinating fabric.

larkcrafts.com

larkcrafts.com

sewmamasew.com

sewmamasew.com

True Love: Embellished with a pretty fabric flower at the waist.

Clothespin: Has pockets and is embellished with jumbo rick rack (optional).

seasonedhomemaker.com

seasonedhomemaker.com

barij.typepad.com

barij.typepad.com

Simple Flat Front: A work apron ideal for crafters since it’s short and has a wide front pocket to hold gadgets.

Tailored & Lined: This is nice and long and made by repurposing an old dress.

pleasantviewschoolhouse.blogspot.ca

pleasantviewschoolhouse.blogspot.ca

frogcreekcottage.com

frogcreekcottage.com

Gathering: Another goody that’s ideal for collecting eggs and garden produce.

Holiday: Fun, festive and easy to make with a piece of eyelet, grosgrain ribbon and a bit of fabric.

marthastewart.com

marthastewart.com

cicadadaydream.blogspot.ca

cicadadaydream.blogspot.ca

Panels: Four different fabric panels make the body, gathered at waist and ties at the back.

Kaleidoscope: One of my favorites, pin-tuck waistband is wide in the center front, ties wrap around to front.

etsy.com

etsy.com

robertkaufman.com

robertkaufman.com

Happy Homemaker: Click “Download More Info” top right of page, also includes directions for making a table runner and placemats.

Also see this one that’s made with fat quarters.

Assorted

creatingbycami.blogspot.ca

creatingbycami.blogspot.ca

For Children: Has a pull-over neck strap and waist straps are held in place with a bit of velcro.

For Cleaning: Gathers at the waist and has big roomy pockets across the front to hold cleaning supplies.

organizedhome.com

organizedhome.com

marthastewart.com

marthastewart.com

Carryall: Smart idea using a full length, ready made apron. Fold up the bottom then sew down the center to make deep pockets.

Clothespin: European style with deep front pockets to hold pegs.

motherearthnews.com

motherearthnews.com

janesapron.typepad.com

janesapron.typepad.com

Twill-Ribbon Waist: Made with a single piece of fabric and has deep front pockets to hold craft supplies.

Tool Belt: Made with an old sheet or other repurposed material and twill tape.

heart-of-light.blogspot.ca

heart-of-light.blogspot.ca

madaboutpink.blogspot.ca

madaboutpink.blogspot.ca

Vendor: Suitable for beginners, this can be made with an old scarf or other repurposed fabric.

You’ll also find over a dozen different ways to make them with dish towels on this page (scroll to the bottom half).

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Published: June 28, 2008
Updated: January 8, 2013

What Readers Are Saying:
16 Comments to “40+ Free Apron Patterns & Tutorials”
  1. Domestic Chicky says:

    Yay!! Thank you for these!! You can bet I will link these on the Apronista too! I don’t know how yo manage to find them all!!

    Deanna

  2. Lady Cordelia says:

    Yeah!!!! More aprons! Thanks so much!!!

  3. Lee-Ann says:

    Hi!
    Thanks for including me on your list! I’m also excited to check out everyone elses ideas. So many creative people in one place – awesome!

  4. giabella designs says:

    Thanks for including my “pleated hem” tutorial on this site. It was exciting to see. It is so validating, even if it helps just one person! Thanks again!

  5. Patty says:

    I got this e-mail about aprons, and as I have been perusing all the beautiful apron patterns people have been sharing, I thought I would share the thoughts. Patty

    Subject: Fw: THE APRON

    Do you remember ?

    The History of ‘APRONS’

    I don’t think our kids know what an apron is.

    The principal use of Grandma’s apron was to protect the dress underneath, because she only had a few, it was easier to wash aprons than dresses and they used less material, but along with that, it s erved as a potholder for
    removing hot pans from the oven.

    It was wonderful for drying children’s tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears.

    From the chicken coop, the apron was used for carrying eggs, fussy chicks, and sometimes half-hatched eggs to be finished in the warming oven.

    When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids.

    And when the weather was cold, grandma wrapped it around her arms.

    Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow, bent over the hot wood stove.

    Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen in that apron.

    From the garden, it carried all sorts of vegetables. After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls.

    In the fall, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees.

    When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how muc h furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds.

    When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron, and the men knew it was time to come in from the fields to dinner.

    It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that ‘old-time apron’ that served so many purposes.

    Send this to those who would know (and love) the story about Grandma’s aprons.

    REMEMBER:

    Grandma used to set her hot baked apple pies on the window sill to cool.
    Her granddaughters set theirs on the window sill to thaw.

    I remember my Grandmothers wearing aprons,and my mother. Good old days,women would not wear them today, no need, no cook stoves, kindeling and no eggs to gather. time gone by. JIM H.

    I remember my great-grandmother wearing an apron. She always had one on when she did her baking. And I thank her for all the beautiful pies! I was just a little girl at the time, but now I have those recipes and her know how. I make some of the best pies around! and. . .now all I need is an apron! Thank all you ladies for sharing your patterns. Patty

  6. mikell says:

    I want to make the frilly reversible apron, but can’t find how much to enlarge the pattern. Can anyone help? Thanks!

  7. Anne M. says:

    just wanted to let you know that #3 & #7 in the full apron category are no longer available

  8. gina says:

    Hi,

    Wheres the pattern for making the striped aprons with the bow(top of the page)….super cute

  9. Linda says:

    The floral pinafore was the style I’m
    mostly interested in, but the pattern not
    available.

    Elsewhere in this weeks’ tips, the link to
    the window treatments patterns are not
    available.

    Love all the goodies and tips each week.
    Thanks!

    • Tipnut says:

      Hi Linda, I just double checked the links and they are loading for me. Maybe they were temporarily down when you checked?

  10. giraffemom says:

    I’ve been hunting for an apron that doesn’t tie or hang on the neck at all (arthritic neck makes it painful). Have you seen an apron pattern for one that might go over the shoulders and tie into the waistband somehow?

  11. Patricia says:

    thank you thank you for for the apron downloads – loved them – wonderful wonderful site

  12. Margi says:

    Thank you soooo very much for the wonderful patterns!! I still wear aprons, and love the great variety. Can’t wait to try them all!

  13. Janet says:

    Thank you for sharing all these wonderful apron patterns! I can’t wait to sew them all.

  14. Nancy Bird says:

    Wow looking forward to these wonderful patterns! love to use these as gifts. Especially with good cooking friends.


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