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Beware Of Junk Bunkers

For Packrats Only - Don AslettI know many of you are familiar with Don Aslett’s books about organizing, decluttering & cleaning–and I’m thrilled to be able to introduce his advice to Tipnut readers who have yet to discover his common sense (and often humorous) approach to taking back control of your living space.

Here’s a special treat with an excerpt from his book: For Packrats Only How to clean up, clear out and dejunk your life forever!

This article “Beware of Junk Bunkers” touches on one of my biggest bugaboos–Making room for clutter. I like finding creative ways to pack and organize my stuff. Sometimes though you have to ask yourself if you’re organizing needed items, or are you making room for clutter.

You can visit Don’s home on the web here: The Official Blog Of Don Aslett [1].

Beware of Junk Bunkers

What’s a junk bunker? Anything that creates space for more unnecessary stuff. Example: you need maybe four knives in a kitchen to do everything you need to do. Then you get a nice knife holder and it has twelve slots…Or the desk is overflowing with stuff, 90 percent of which is junk. Instead of cleaning it, you buy a desk organizer (ie., a junk bunker), which allows you to stack it higher and deeper. Unfortunately junk, if stacked neatly enough, even looks valuable. Lots of closet organizers are just junk bunkers. Your closet is loaded, shoes are running over the threshold and out into the creek. Do you sort and unload and get rid of the foot-pinchers and ankle-breakers? No, you buy a junk bunker, a shoe storage unit. Now you can hang them up one side of the door and down the other (and rip the door off its hinges).

They call the new closet contraptions names like “closet organizer.” These and all other bunkers are just innocent pieces of plastic, wood, or metal; they don’t organize anything. You are the organizer, the king, the controller. You’re the one who has to teach your closets and cupboards some discipline to keep them tidy.

This is just the tighter girdle approach: there’s too much there, too many bulges and rolls, so we move from a 6-ply to an 8-ply girdle and it works (or seems to work) as long as we hold our breath. But the problem isn’t gone–it’s just out of sight. Beware the:

Source: From Don Aslett’s book, FOR PACKRATS ONLY, copyright 2002, Marsh Creek Press, used with permission.

I’ve been a long-time fan of Don Aslett and do recommend his books to anyone who wants to take back control of their living space, you can check out his bookstore here: Don’s Online Bookstore [2].