Organize Knitting Needles & Crochet Hooks With Rolls & Cases

Looking for ideas how to keep knitting and crochet tools tidy? Then this is the page for you! Below you’ll find a large collection of free patterns for making needle rolls and hook cases with a wide variety of options and creative features.

Assortment Of Crochet Hooks & Knitting Needles

Listed are over 50 free projects that include both sewing tutorials and crochet patterns.

Free? Absolutely! Each provides immediate access to written instructions (and sometimes a pdf to download or companion video for extra guidance). No emails to submit…no memberships to signup for.

New Collection Update: June, 2022

Once you’ve been knitting and crocheting awhile, you begin to accumulate hooks and needles of all sizes. Then there’s all the little sewing notions that come in handy. You likely even have doubles/triples of one particular size but are manufactured by different brands.

Who wants to waste time digging around a jumbled mess trying to find just the right tool needed at that moment?

The solution: an organizing roll or case. These are very effective in keeping everything sorted and tidy–and they’re easy to make too!

Over the years I’ve learned that I prefer one particular type of hook when I’m working on lots of projects because my hand doesn’t get as tired when I use it, but I prefer using another brand when it’s just a quick pattern I’m doing because it seems to slide in and out easier (nicer to work with).

With crochet I also find switching brands back and forth (while working on the same project) helps my hand not get as sore…I’m thinking it’s because there’s a slight difference with how your hand muscles are being utilized.

All these options mean a lot of supplies that need organizing. You may find it useful to have a few smaller cases to store different types or sizes of tools or one big roll to hold them all, whatever works best for you!

How To Make Organizers For Knitting Needles & Crochet Hooks

These clever items can be made with a variety of materials and they typically don’t cost a lot to make nor do they require a big list of supplies.

Some suggested fabrics:

  • Denim
  • Canvas
  • Quilting Cotton
  • Upholstery Fabric
  • Linen
  • Felt

It all depends on how heavy or sturdy you want it to be, some even prefer them quite flimsy and light. I’ve included a few below that have been made out of placemats (pretty clever). I’ve also come across varieties that have been made with kitchen dish towels or repurposed bedding/pillowcases (in real life, not online projects). There’s a lot of options, I’ve included a vintage roll pattern at the bottom of the page that even suggests taffeta.

The tutorials I’ve put together below have quite a variety of styles and techniques. I’ve organized them into two separate groups for easier browsing:

  • Free Crochet Hook Holders & Pouches
  • Free Knitting Needle Rolls & Organizers

When deciding on which one to make, think about how you want to use it:

  • The amount of items you need to organize
  • Whether or not you want extra space to stash notions such as a pair of embroidery scissors, sewing gauge, stitch markers, etc.
  • Will you travel with it, or just use it at home

If you like one element or feature from a certain design, feel free to incorporate it into the project you choose to go with. And if you’re only interested in one type (knitting needles vs. crochet hooks), still look through both collections. It’s easy to swap out ideas and add tweaks to whichever one you make.

Now on to the goodies! These are all hassle-free with instant access. That means no emails to submit or memberships to signup for. If that has changed since being added to this collection, please let me know in the comments area below so I can remove it.

Directions: Click on images to view project pages, a new browser tab will open & save your spot here

Crochet Hook Pouches, Rolls & Holders

Here’s a nice assortment featuring a good mix of free sewing tutorials and crochet patterns. I think each offers something unique to get those creative juices flowing. These are so useful and practical, I’m sure you’ll find yourself using one for years.


Roll-up Case

This rolls up & ties with satin ribbon, features two rows for organizing hooks. Has a top flap that folds over the hook heads for optimal protection.

Source: fabricmartfabrics.com


Simple & Sassy

Nicely done, made in two complimentary fabrics & tied closed with a pretty velvet ribbon. Instructions are for a matching set (with a knitting needle roll). I like how she used the same fabrics for both, but alternated the inside linings & pockets (one has solid color pocket, the other has floral pocket).

Source: heatherink.com


Felt Hook Book

This is a lovely felt book reminiscent of needlework books like these, but for crochet. Fabric lined with a corner to stash sewing needles, fastens closed with a button & loop. Very nice!

Source: sewcando.com


Star Stitch Case

Promises to be simple, fast & customizable. Suggests blocking it before using so it’s evenly shaped. The hooks slide in ribs on “wrong side”.

Source: allicrafts.blogspot.com


Fabric Tool Organizer

This will store all the assorted tools you may need for a project (such as scissors, measuring tape, circular needles, sewing gauge & more). Includes a quick video showing you how to assemble the pieces.

Source: clover-usa.com


Felted

Wow! A rectangle is crocheted with wool then felted. Once it’s all assembled, there will be a pocket at each end (one for a notebook, the other zipped) & the center is lined with pretty cotton fabric to hold your hooks. Magnetic clasps secure it closed. This one’s impressive.

Source: hearthookhome.com


Sweet Pouch

I think this is quite adorable, a nice little envelope-style pouch that buttons closed. It is sized just right to stash assorted project tools like a pencil, embroidery scissors, even a pair of reading glasses. Love this cutie!

Source: knittingwithchopsticks.com


Plastic Canvas Holder

A pretty nifty idea that can be used for a variety of things (including pencils, craft tools, paint brushes, etc.). Made with a sheet of 10-count plastic canvas, 2 plastic canvas coaster rounds & a bit of yarn. Project details provided via free pdf download (found here). Very useful, I don’t want to lose track of this one!

Source: makezine.com


Zipped Pouch

A super sweet pouch based on a bobble granny square. Includes a free pdf pattern download. Six squares are crocheted then joined together, a zipped lining stitched in place. Really lovely!

Source: marroos.wordpress.com


Curved Flap

Here’s another great project that features a curved top flap with a button/loop closure, the other end has a zippered pocket to store assorted items. Center organizes all the hooks.

Source: missusvonkysmeed.blogspot.com


Knitting Needle Rolls & Pouches

There’s quite a nice variety in this bunch. You’ll find some that are quite large and loaded with pockets and features, others are more basic and small.

Personally, I found having a big one ideal for holding all my supplies but it was a bit heavy and awkward toting around…and unnecessary (at one time I could bring my knitting to work). The solution was to continue using it as my main organizer but having a smaller one setup to stash everything I needed for a particular project and leaving the rest at home.

For this collection I wasn’t very diligent about weeding out duplicates. Many look the same but have slightly different finishing or utilitarian elements to them…but even if there are a few exactly alike (I’m not even sure there are any), I thought it helpful to include a wide variety showcasing how different fabrics can be used (all the same print or solid, different fabric types/weights, how they can work together, larger prints vs. smaller, etc.).

I also added a vintage pattern from my personal collection for a taffeta roll at the bottom of this page (includes a free pdf to download).

Alexandra’s Case

Wow, is this packed with features! It has 4 pouch strips (including pockets for circular needles & DPNs). Finished size is 20 1/2″ wide, 17 1/2″ high. Rolls up & is secured with two fabric ties.

Source: alexandrasknits.blogspot.com


Fabric Roll Tutorial

This has three rows to hold all sorts of goodies, I love the fabric choices here (especially the measuring tape design at the bottom row).

Source: lupinbunny.blogspot.com


Felt Case

This isn’t a step-by-step written tutorial but several diagrams showing measurements plus cut & fold lines. Easy enough to figure out, I like how one side of the case is for long needles & the other has different sized pockets for notions & circulars.

Source: cardboardboyfriend.com


Hook & Needle Case

Here’s another unique way to arrange pockets. Tall straights on one side, shallower pocket on the other for hooks. Nice diagrams & directions for sewing it up.

Source: wecanmakeanything.net


Kimono Wrap

I like the bottom row that increases in size as it goes from one end to the other, making it ideal for holding small objects like thimbles & snips that are tricky to dig out of bigger pockets. Made with a yard of fabric in two prints & some scraps.

Source: craftbits.com


Nifty Organizer

Here’s another feature rich project, it has a clear vinyl zipped pouch on one side so it’s easy to find the tool you want. The other side has two rows, one for holding taller needles, the bottom for holding small hooks. Velcro tab closure.

Source: googiemomma.blogspot.com


Placemat Wrap

A nice ‘n easy project for inexperienced sewers, a length of 1″ wide braided elastic is sewn down the center (stitch every 0.5″ to 1.5″ to hold assorted needles). Top and bottom edges of placemat are then folded over as protective flaps, ends stitched in place. Elastic loops attached on sides to hold it all together. Super easy!

Source: grumperina.com


DPN Pouches

A nice way to keep a set of DPNs together, these simple fabric pouches take just minutes to make. A great fabric stash buster! She recommends stitching the needle size on the outside or a number shaped button so you can see at a glance what they are.

Source: kathrynivy.com


Placemat Organizer

Another time-saving project using placemats, this incorporates two of them & features a nice amount of pockets to hold circulars, straights, DPNs & more goodies. Beginner friendly (sewing).

Source: organizedeveryday.blogspot.com


Circulars Case

This is designed to hold all your circular needles together in one place. A neat suggestion is to use cotton tape & rubber ink stamps to note the sizes. Everything rolls up together & stays in place with 2 button/loops. Has a zipped back pocket as well.

Source: thevillagehaberdashery.co.uk


Clear Elastic Strip

I just wanted to point out a neat feature on this particular roll (which is made with a placemat), it has a strip of 3/8″ clear elastic sewn across the top (stitched every inch or so) to hold the needles in place. Clever!

Source: vanillajoy.com


Vintage Pattern

This is from 1945 and specifies taffeta as the material to be used, but feel free to select different material if you like.

Vintage Taffeta Knitting Needle Roll (1945)

Materials:

3/8 yard navy Taffeta
3/8 yard light blue Taffeta
3/8 yard Crinoline for interlining
Sewing thread in matching colors

Cutting Directions:

  • 3 pieces–13″ x 13 1/2″ (one of navy, one of light blue, one of crinoline)
  • 1 piece–6″ x 10″ (of navy) for top flap
  • 1 piece–11″ x 13 1/2″ (of navy) for pocket
  • 2 strips–1″ x 9″ of navy for ties.

Directions:
(1/2″ allowed for seams)

  1. Fold 11″ x 13 1/2″ piece in half on the length (wrong sides together) and press.
  2. Baste raw edges to right side of light blue piece along 13 1/2″ edge and up the sides.
  3. Starting from the right, mark off pocket piece into following spaces: One 1 3/8″, four 1 1/8″, one 1 3/8″, five 1″, one 1 3/8″.
  4. Stitch along marking through all thicknesses.
  5. Fold 6″ x 10″ piece in half on the length (right sides together), stitch across short ends, turn to right side and press.
  6. Baste this piece to right side of 13″ x 13 1/2″ navy piece opposite the pocket, raw edge to raw edge, matching centers.
  7. Fold tie pieces in half on the length and stitch around all except one short side, turn to right side and press.
  8. Tack raw edge of both ties to right side of 13″ x 13 1/2″ piece at center of one 13″ side.
  9. Baste crinoline to wrong side of 13″ x 13 1/2″ navy piece.
  10. Baste and stitch 13″ x 13 1/2″ pieces together (right sides together), leaving a 4″ opening.
  11. Turn to right side, slip stitch opening and press. Insert supplies in pockets as shown. (A piece of flannel or felt with pinked edges may be sewn to top flap).

You can download a copy of the tutorial for yourself here (pdf).

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Comments

    • Carol
    Reply

    I don’t know who you are, but I love you.

    I have been searching for a knitting needle/accessory caddy/whatever and came upon the Mama-Load when I landed here…you are glorious.

    Thank you, for now I have a gaggle of patterns from which to choose for making my friend’s Solstice gift!

    Peace & Joy ~Carol

    • Michelle
    Reply

    Thank you, Thank you, Thank you! Tipnut.com is my go-to place when I have a need to make some sewing project. I have made so many items from the patterns you have on your website. And today, I’m making the hanging circular needle holder….I have TWO choices from your free patterns. That’s totally amazing!

    Love and hugs,
    Michelle

    • Debbie
    Reply

    Thank you so much for the wonderful free patterns for all varieties of knitting needle cases, and rolls. Also for the crochet hook rolls and cases, too.

    You are wonderful! I will be telling all my friends about your great site.

    Now I won’t be misplacing any more of my needles, hooks or accessories!

    Thanks again! You have made my day!

    Debbie A.

    • Norma
    Reply

    Thanks like everyone else. These patterns are great! I have bought knitting needle rolls and have always had a problem with the commercial ones. These patterns are just what I need for my variety of knitting needles Thanks PS I googled knitting needle cases to make and found this site. It is totally awesome!!!

    • Lynn Carden-Matthews
    Reply

    What a very simple and ingenious idea. Will not only be making but also passing on the pattern to all my knitting friends. Thanks so much

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